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Risk Factors for Rosacea

A risk factor is something that increases your chance of getting a disease or condition.

It is possible to develop rosacea with or without the risk factors listed below. However, the more risk factors you have, the greater your likelihood of developing rosacea. If you have a number of risk factors, ask your doctor what you can do to reduce your risk.

Common risk factors for rosacea include:

Gender

Women develop rosacea somewhat more frequently than men, although men are more prone to developing severe rosacea. These observations may be due in part to the fact that women are more likely to see a doctor than men. Men are more likely to seek medical attention only after the condition reaches advanced stages.

Age

Rosacea tends to develop in adults between the ages of 30 and 60 years of age. In women, some cases of rosacea occur around the onset of menopause.

Family Members with Rosacea

A tendency to develop rosacea may be inherited. It can often be found in several members of the same family.

Fair Skin

Although rosacea can develop in people of any skin color, it tends to occur most often in people with fair skin.

Sun Exposure

Exposure to the sun may cause skin and blood vessel damage, especially on the face. This may increase the risk of developing rosacea.

History of Acne

A history of acne, especially with cysts, is associated with an increased risk of rosacea.

Ethnic Background

While the disorder can occur in all ethnic groups, it has been found to be prevalent among people of English, Scottish, Scandinavian, and Northern or Eastern European ancestry.

Revision Information

  • Questions and answers about rosacea. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) website. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health%5FInfo/Rosacea/default.asp. Updated September 2013. Accessed December 28, 2015.

  • Rosacea. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. December 10, 2015. Accessed December 28, 2015.

  • Rosacea: Who gets and causes. American Academy of Dermatology website. Available at: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/rosacea. Accessed December 28, 2015.

  • Sunshine casts a rosacea shadow. National Rosacea Society website. Available at: http://www.rosacea.org/rr/2002/spring/article%5F2.php. Accessed December 28, 2015.